Maybe “Little Box of Crayons: a stay-at-home mom with four little crayons” would have fit this theme better

But, then, it’s only because they didn’t have any penguin themes. Or arctic/antarctic. Or snow. Or… well, anything that would really fit with penguins. I don’t really like cold or snow, anyway. I’m a temperate penguin. 🙂

Our move is happening slowly. We are finally out of our old house. Thankfully. I am so, so glad to be out of there. However, we still don’t have a settlement date on our new house. Mortgage company stinks. After this is settled, I need to go write reviews on every site I can find about how awful they are. Anyway, due to their constant ability to lose paperwork, overlook crucial details and suddenly require us to rush rush rush to fix things they forgot, settlement keeps getting pushed back. So we still don’t have a date to officially move in yet. However, the seller agreed to pre-occupancy, which means he allowed us to move our stuff in even though we hadn’t reached settlement yet. This was very kind of him, as Seth had to start work on Monday and really didn’t have any other days that would work to unload the truck, and it would cost us $90 or so a day for every day we kept the truck. Could have gotten very expensive for us (like $900) if he hadn’t let us unload. Now we just have to hope that the mortgage company gets all the paperwork together and hasn’t forgotten/lost some other crucial document so that we can actually go to settlement soon and start to unpack. The girls and I are staying temporarily with my parents, who live about 1.5 hours away, and Seth is staying with a friend who lives near work. It’s nice to visit with my parents, but I’d like to not feel like I’m *stuck* here because I don’t have a home of my own right now. Come on, mortgage company, get it together!

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Ancient Greece, revisited

I found some more books that I plan to add as readers when we do Greece.  They are Tales from the Odyssey, by Mary Pope Osborne (author of the Magic Tree House books).  Emily loves the Magic Tree House books, so she’ll probably enjoy the style.  They review really well, and I’d actually really wanted to cover the story of the Odyssey as I think it’s such a crucial book when you’re learning about Greece.  The stories are fun and memorable, too, which I think makes them well-suited to being adapted for kids.  I still think, whenever I eat something hot, of Odysseus and his men being so hungry when they ate the Cyclops’ meat that they burned their hands and mouths and didn’t care, because they were that hungry.  Or the part where he had his men plug their ears but he didn’t and had his men tie him to the mast, because he wanted to know what the Siren’s song sounded like.  Etc.  I think the combination of Greek Myths (Sonlight already includes this), Aesop’s Fables, and the Odyssey gives a really good glimpse into some of the literature that we value the most from ancient Greece.

Ancient Africa

And last, we have Africa.  This was the hardest to find *anything* for.  Egypt is, of course, in Africa, and seems to be far the dominant African history.  While Nubia is mentioned often in the Bible and history, and even in an Agatha Christie book I was reading they refer to African natives as “Nubians,” I was unable to find any fiction books to add to Sonlight’s Core B study of Africa.  There are some nonfiction books, but generally they look a bit too advanced to hold the interest of my daughter, and I think she’d only tolerate them to get to the fiction, of which there isn’t really any of significance.

The only books I can think to add are books of African folktales, legends, and myths, *some* of which may be old enough to have come from ancient Africa.  The Anansi spider stories are very old, for instance, although I can’t verify that they would quite count as “ancient.”  There are also some books of African folktales, like the Nelson Mandela’s Favorite African Folktales, that may contain tales old enough.  So my plan is just to basically throw myself upon the mercy of my local library and librarians and see what they can come up with in terms of ancient Africa.  Most libraries would at least have some Anansi stories, and those tend to be pretty fun.  Pot of Wisdom: Anansi Stories sounds like an interesting one.  So no list of specific add-ons for Africa, sorry!

Ancient India

This one was pretty hard to find much to add on.  There’s just not a lot on ancient India at the right age range, and it’s hard to figure out time periods for a lot of the items I found.  So, just like for China, I can’t guarantee that every book I’ve listed here takes place during the same time period as Sonlight’s Core B study of India.  I hope they do, but I’ve done most of my research online and don’t have Core B in hand yet, so I can’t be absolutely sure.

The books that Sonlight uses in Core B that look to deal with ancient India are:
A Child’s History of the World
The Usborne Book of World History
Usborne Time Traveler
There might also be a bit in:
The Usborne Book of Houses and Homes
The Usborne Book of Peoples of the World

The books I’ll be adding for ancient India are:

Hands-on:
Usborne Sticker Dressing Long Ago (Megan Cullis)
Hands and Hearts Ancient Far East Discovery kit (http://handsnhearts.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=1&products_id=12#.UYRWmrXpa7w)) This kit is for both China and India.

Read-alouds (some of these may work as readers):

Rama and the Demon King (Souhami)
Brave Little Parrot (Martin)
Savitri (Mathews) (a friend says this book is rather dark, so be warned)

Readers:

Pearl of Bengal (#2 in the Agatha: Girl of Mystery series by Stevenson)
King’s Warrior (Gunderson)
Elephant Dancer (Gunderson)
Horse on the Hill (Gunderson)
Servant and the Water Princess (Gunderson)

Ancient China

Ancient China!  My oldest is really looking forward to this one.  I’m not entirely sure what period Sonlight focuses on for ancient China, and for some of the books I’m adding it’s a little difficult to tell what year they take place (and some I haven’t looked at, just seen reviews of online).  So my apologies if any of the books I’ve selected are outside of the time period studied in Core B.

The books that Sonlight uses in Core B that look to deal with ancient China are:
A Child’s History of the World
The Usborne Book of World History
Usborne Time Traveler
The Great Wall of China
There might also be a bit in:
The Usborne Book of Houses and Homes
The Usborne Book of Peoples of the World

The books I’ll be adding for ancient China are:

Hands-on:

Usborne Sticker Dressing Long Ago (Megan Cullis)
Ancient Far East Discovery kit (http://handsnhearts.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=1&products_id=12#.UYRWmrXpa7w)  This is for both China and India.

Read-alouds (some of these might be good as readers):
Adventures in Ancient China (Linda Bailey, Good Times Travel Agency series)
Dragon Emperor (Ping Wang)
Dream-of-Jade: The Emperor’s Cat (Alexander)
The Warlord’s Alarm (and other “Warlord’s” books by Pilegard)
Ms. Frizzle’s Adventures: Imperial China (Cole)
We’re Riding on a Caravan (Krebs)
Yeh-Shen (Young)

Readers:
The Emperor’s Painting: A Story of Ancient China (Jessica Gunderson)
The Jade Dragon: A Story of Ancient China (Jessica Gunderson)
Stranger on the Silk Road: A Story of Ancient China (Jessica Gunderson)
The Terracotta Girl: A Story of Ancient China (Jessica Gunderson)

Ancient Rome

And now on to ancient Rome!

The books that Sonlight uses in Core B that look to deal with ancient Rome are:
A Child’s History of the World
The Usborne Book of World History
Usborne Time Traveler
Roman Diary
Detectives in Togas
There might also be a bit in:
The Usborne Book of Houses and Homes
The Usborne Book of Peoples of the World

The books I’ll be adding for ancient Rome are:

Hands-on:
Usborne Sticker Dressing Long Ago (Megan Cullis)
Hands and Hearts History kit (http://handsnhearts.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=1&products_id=4#.UYRWtrXpa7w) This kit is for both Greece and Rome.

Read-alouds (some of these may work as readers):
History News: The Roman News (Andrew Langley)
A Triumph for Flavius (Caroline Snedeker, looks like a great transition from Greece to Rome)
Little Miriam of Galilee (Edith Martin, Biblical Roman history)
Out of Darkness (Alicia Peterson, Biblical Roman history)
Brave Cloelia (Livy)

Readers:
The Shepherd and the Racehorse (Blackaby)
The Torchbearer (Blackaby)
The Secret Warning (Blackaby)
The Blue Stone Plot (Blackaby)

If you’re doing Core B with an older child (8 or so) you might want to add these:
Rotten Romans (Terry Deary, Horrible Histories series)
Ruthless Romans (Terry Deary, Horrible Histories series)
City: A Story of Roman Planning and Construction (David MacAulay)
Rome Antics (David MacAulay)

Ancient Greece

The books that Sonlight uses in Core B that look to deal with ancient Greece are:
A Child’s History of the World
The Usborne Book of World History
Usborne Time Traveler
Greek News
Usborne Greek Myths
There might also be a bit in:
The Usborne Book of Houses and Homes
The Usborne Book of Peoples of the World

Books I’ll be adding for ancient Greece are:

Hands-on:

Usborne Sticker Dressing Long Ago (Megan Cullis)
Hands and Hearts History kit (http://handsnhearts.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=1&products_id=4#.UYRWtrXpa7w) This kit is for both Greece and Rome.

Read-alouds (some of these may actually work as readers):
Jason and the Argonauts (Jessica Gunderson)
Lysis Goes to the Play (Caroline Snedeker)
Adventures in Ancient Greece (Linda Bailey, Good Times Travel Agency series)
Pegasus (Mayer)
The First Marathon: The Legend of Pheidippides (Reynolds)
Aesop’s Fables (Santore)

Readers:
The Town Mouse and the Spartan Mouse (Deary)
The Tortoise and the Hare (Deary)
The Boy Who Cried Horse (Deary)
The Lion’s Slave (Deary)

If you’re doing Core B with an older child (8 or so) you might want to add this:
Groovy Greeks (Terry Deary)